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An annular solar eclipse is coming to parts of the U.S. in October

People use protective glasses to watch solar eclipse in Jakarta, Indonesia, Thursday, April 20, 2023.
Tatan Syuflana
/
AP
People use protective glasses to watch solar eclipse in Jakarta, Indonesia, Thursday, April 20, 2023.

Get your eclipse glasses ready!

Next month the moon will pass between Earth and the sun, treating viewers here on our planet to a solar eclipse.

For some, this will be an annular solar eclipse. That occurs when the moon is at or near the furthest point its orbit and appears small in the sky, and its transit in front of the sun will look like a black circle on the gleaming star.

In the U.S., the annular eclipse on Saturday, Oct. 14 will be visible in parts of Oregon, California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas, according to NASA.

It will begin in Oregon at 9:13 a.m. PDT and end in Texas at 12:03 p.m. CDT.

Viewers in the rest of the continental U.S. should be able to see a partial solar eclipse.

The path of the annular eclipse will also cross into Mexico and other parts of Central and South America.

When trying to catch a glimpse of the annular solar eclipse, don't look at the sun with your naked eye or through sunglasses, binoculars or a telescope.

NASA recommends you wear safe solar viewing glasses or use a safe handheld solar viewer, which will help protect your eyes. You can also use an indirect method for viewing the eclipse, experts say, such as a pinhole projector.

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Joe Hernandez