KOMUnews | Licensed under CC BY 2.0

For many people, one of the rites of fall is getting the flu shot. 

According to the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control, the upcoming flu season could arrive early and be more severe. That’s because last time around, we had an unusually mild flu season likely due to COVID-19 mitigation measures like face masks, hand washing, and physical distancing. As a result, population immunity against the flu is now much lower.

Diana Robinson via Flickr | Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0


The fall season is a time of pride for many New Mexicans – hot air balloons fill the early morning skies, the smell of green chile slowly turning in roasters is on every corner, and many travel from all sorts of places to see the state’s beautiful fall colors. 

But, this year has shown the climate is changing. Fast. And that fall landscape we are so used to seeing? It’s changing too.

Public Domain

The theme for this week’s installment of New Mexico Politics is court battles… Sounds fun, right? 

Justin Lane / Shutterstock

This summer, the federal government announced that emergency pandemic SNAP benefits would be slashed at the end of September.

Now, the state of New Mexico has secured a small extension in these benefits for at least another month.

Community Matters - September 2021

Sep 16, 2021

Guest Lea Knutson, founder and Executive Director of the Hermit's Peak Watershed Alliance.  The organization is the winner of Santa Fe Community Foundation's 2021 Piñon Visionary Award, and Lea discusses their work on watersheds in the Las Vegas area and beyond.

"Busy Waiter" by Ralph and Jenny | Licensed under CC BY 2.0

Running a restaurant is a risky business in the best of times.  According to the National Restaurant Association, during the pandemic, some 90,000 restaurants in the U.S. closed permanently.

L-R: Rachael Lorenzo, Nicole Martin, Malia Luarkie, New Mexico Roundhouse, March 2019 | Courtesy of Indigenous Women Rising

A new law went into effect last week in Texas, making almost all abortions functionally illegal in the state. Experts say this is the most restrictive abortion bill yet, leaving many people looking to places like New Mexico to seek care.

@Jimg944 via Flickr | Licensed under CC BY 2.0

After many months of staying at home during the pandemic, both Americans and New Mexicans are ready to drive, fly, and yes, sail once again. 

Courtesy of Somos Un Pueblo Unido

90 New Mexican public officials are now urging Congress to step up and establish a path to citizenship for undocumented workers. 

This cry comes as the Covid-19 pandemic highlighted the crucial role these workers play in our economy and the inequities these workers face when they are excluded from federal economic relief programs.

Courtesy of photographer Will Wilson

Fifty indigenous artists from around the world express their individual and group interpretations of shared experiences involving nuclear hazards. 

KSFR's Dennis Carroll reports on the new exhibition at the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MOCNA).

Pages

Join the team!

KSFR is currently seeking freelance journalists and an Underwriting Sales Representative

This Week On Here & There

MONDAY 9/27 Today on HERE & THERE: If the now year and a half long siege of Covid-19 has been stressful for adults, has it been even harder to handle for children? Katie Stone, host and producer of the excellent radio program The Children's Hour , says one answer does not fit all kids. So how can adults help their children? Finding out what they know is a good start. The story, in depth on HERE & THERE, right after the 4 o’clock news.

Read More

HERE & THERE with Dave Marash

50 minutes of insights and observations from journalists and analysts covering the most interesting stories in the news HERE (in New Mexico and the Southwest) and THERE (everywhere else)

Listen to KSFR talk shows when YOU want to.

Click for detailed set-up.

Trinity At 75: A Series By Dennis Carroll

Trinity Witnesses Recall Summer "Snow"

This year is the 75th anniversary of the Trinity Test in southern New Mexico. It was the first detonation of a nuclear device—the unleashing of the unholy might of the tiny atom. To mark the occasion, reporter Dennis Carroll, in an ongoing series of reports, examines what we have learned about the changing attitudes, the shroud of secrecy, claims of bad science and the apparent utter disregard for Trinity’s neighbors that now surround the test and its aftermath decades later.

Read More