Covid-19

KOMUnews | Licensed under CC BY 2.0

For many people, one of the rites of fall is getting the flu shot. 

According to the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control, the upcoming flu season could arrive early and be more severe. That’s because last time around, we had an unusually mild flu season likely due to COVID-19 mitigation measures like face masks, hand washing, and physical distancing. As a result, population immunity against the flu is now much lower.

Public Domain

The theme for this week’s installment of New Mexico Politics is court battles… Sounds fun, right? 

Justin Lane / Shutterstock

This summer, the federal government announced that emergency pandemic SNAP benefits would be slashed at the end of September.

Now, the state of New Mexico has secured a small extension in these benefits for at least another month.

"Busy Waiter" by Ralph and Jenny | Licensed under CC BY 2.0

Running a restaurant is a risky business in the best of times.  According to the National Restaurant Association, during the pandemic, some 90,000 restaurants in the U.S. closed permanently.

Courtesy of Somos Un Pueblo Unido

90 New Mexican public officials are now urging Congress to step up and establish a path to citizenship for undocumented workers. 

This cry comes as the Covid-19 pandemic highlighted the crucial role these workers play in our economy and the inequities these workers face when they are excluded from federal economic relief programs.

Via New Mexico Department of Health


Data from the New Mexico Department of Health is now showing that kids who identify as Hispanic or Latino are at the bottom of the list when it comes to vaccination rates in the state. 

Bryce Dix | KSFR

This month yet another COVID-19 fraud made the headlines — this one involving fake vaccination cards. 

TayebMEZAHDIA / Pixabay

During the pandemic, many relied on government relief to make ends meet. But, new research shows New Mexico’s Asian/Pacific Islander and African immigrants and refugees were left behind. New Mexico Voices For Children talks about how we can create more inclusive systems as the pandemic rages on.

@Auraelius via Flickr | Licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

It’s all about legislative sessions in this week's update on the happenings of New Mexico's political world. KSFR's News Director Bryce Dix sat down with New Mexico Political Report's Andy Lyman to forecast and explain the basics of the once-in-a-decade redistricting special session scheduled in the fall. 

@Neil Moralee via Flickr | Licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

As businesses struggle to find employees, counselors offer jobs advice to older workers considering a return to the workplace.

Two employment advisers talk with KSFR's Dennis Carroll about ways workers can adjust to often frustrating and confusing changes at work sites after years of being home bodies.

Courtesy Photo | Alan Webber

In KSFR's last installment of  conversations with the candidates for Santa Fe’s mayoral seat, reporter Taylor Velazquez sat down with incumbent Santa Fe Mayor Alan Webber to talk about his plans for additional sustainability measures and rebuilding the city’s economy after last year’s COVID shutdowns.

@koczkodan via Flickr | Licensed by CC 2.0

Quarantines, mask mandates, and social distancing have pushed more families to bridge the gap of isolation and loneliness with pets of all kinds and sizes. 

But, as KSFR’s Mary Lou Cooper reports, with this newfound demand for furry friends comes a scam that advertises pets online with the intention of taking money from victims. 

NMDOH

The New Mexico Department of Health reports that although the risks are small, Johnson and Johnson vaccine breakthroughs were 50 percent more likely than Pfizer vaccine breakthroughs. 

Katherine Conley for KSFR | katieconleyphotography.com


It’s apparent society is more than excited to be going back to the times before the pandemic– drinks and laughs are now being shared at bars, music is flowing from concert venues, and awkward first dates are making their return debut to restaurants across the country. But, the story is completely different for those who experienced loss during one of the darkest times in modern history.

Luis Sánchez Saturno / The New Mexican

Food insecurity has been a persistent struggle that COVID-19 only worsened and shined a light on. Now, the pandemic seems to be in the rearview mirror for many, but the issues of hunger are still persisting for many New Mexicans. 

Pages